Radium and radon in ground water in the Chickies Quartzite, southeastern Pennsylvania
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Radium and radon in ground water in the Chickies Quartzite, southeastern Pennsylvania by Lisa A. Senior

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Science Information Center, Open-File Reports Section [distributor] in Lemoyne, Pa, Denver, Colo .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Groundwater -- Pollution -- Pennsylvania,
  • Radioactive pollution of water -- Pennsylvania,
  • Radium -- Environmental aspects -- Pennsylvania,
  • Radon -- Environmental aspects -- Pennsylvania

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Lisa A. Senior and Karen L. Vogel ; prepared in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Bureau of Radiation Protection
SeriesWater-resources investigations report -- 92-4088
ContributionsVogel, Karen L, Pennsylvania. Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, Pennsylvania. Bureau of Radiation Protection, Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 145 p. :
Number of Pages145
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13618339M
OCLC/WorldCa33062420

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The Chickies Quartzite, a Lower Cambrian-age formation compromised of quartzite and slate overlying a basal conglomerate, forms a narrow ridges and crops out discontinuously over square miles in the Piedmont physiographic province of southeastern Pennsylvania. The formation is a low-yielding, fractured- rock, water-table aquifer recharged primarily by local precipitation. Radium and radon in ground water in the Chickies Quartzite, southeastern Pennsylvania / By Lisa A. Senior, Karen L. Vogel, Geological Survey (U.S.), Pennsylvania. Bureau of Radiation Protection. and Pennsylvania. Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey. Abstract. One folded map in ng list no.: es bibliographical. Geologic and Geochemical Factors Controlling Uranium, Radium, and Radon in Ground Water, Newark Basin, New Jersey (Z. Szabo and O.S. Zapecza). Radium, Radium, and Radon in Ground Water of the Chickies Quartzite, Southeastern Pennsylvania (L.D. Cecil, L.A. Senior, and K.L. Vogel). Radium In the oil and gas industries. Residues from the oil and gas industry often contain radium and its daughters. The sulfate scale from an oil well can be very radium rich. It is the case that the water inside an oil field is often very rich in strontium, barium and radium while seawater is very rich in sulfate so if water from an oil well is discharged into the sea or mixed with seawater.

radon in the ground water of the Chickies Quartzite by Senior and Vogel (). A sufficient number of samples col­ lected from other geologic units, however, have been analyzed to provide an overview of the occurrence and distribution of radionuclides in ground water in southeastern Pennsylvania.   Only a small percentage of water systems have radium at levels that exceed this limit. From to , public water systems serving , Americans in 27 states reported radium . in the Chickies, Quartzite, southeastern Radon in the Ground Water of Chester County, Pennsylvania. effective dose equivalent from radon and radium in the water . How Buildings Draw Radon Gases from the Ground. The "stack effect" – Soil gas carrying radon moves to the permeable gravel and disturbed ground around the house, particularly when "bottled up" by frozen or rain-soaked ground. The air pressure inside homes is slightly lower than in the ground (typically psi vacuum), which draws in radon gas from several feet away.

Naturally occurring radionuclides in the ground water of southeastern Pennsylvania may pose a health hazard to some residents, especially those drinking water from wells drilled in the Chickies Quartzite. Water from 46 percent of wells sampled in the Chickies Quartzite and 7 percent of wells sampled in other geologic formations exceeded the U.S. Radium, radium, and radon in groundwater of the Chickies Quartzite, southeastern Pennsylvania. Radium concentrations from wells range from less than to 31 picocuries. Abstract. Uranium ( U) is a natural radioactive element that is present in all rocks and soils in various of U through a series of shorter-lived radionuclides eventually produces radium ( Ra), which has a half-life of years. Radium decays by alpha-particle emission directly to radon ( Rn), which is short-lived (half-life = days).   Radon, Radium, and Uranium in Drinking Water book. Radon, Radium, and Uranium in Drinking Water. DOI link for Radon, Radium, and Uranium in Drinking Water. Radon, Radium, and Uranium in Drinking Water book. By C. Richard Cothern. Edition 1st Edition. First Published eBook Published 22 July